Be a Witness to the Resurrection

Jesus’ resurrection is what Easter is all about, but another dimension that keeps surfacing in the New Testament accounts of Easter – and actually long after Easter – is the disciples’ witness to the resurrection. We see this dimension built in to the Easter accounts themselves – in John 20, for example, Mary Magdalene meets Jesus in the garden, and after she realises who he is and he speaks to her, she goes and tells the disciples ‘I have seen the Lord’. In Matthew 20:8, the women who have seen Jesus run to tell the disciples their eyewitness testimony – in a society where women did not typically run. In Luke 24, when the two disciples have met Jesus on the road to Emmaus, and have finally seen who he is, they return to Jerusalem straight away to tell the others about what has happened to them and that Jesus is alive.

Later, when the disciples meet to choose a Twelfth Man to replace Judas Iscariot, one of the key items of the job description is that this one will be a witness to the resurrection. As the book of Acts unfolds, we see the Spirit-empowered church putting into action Jesus’ command to be his witnesses.

Witnessing to the resurrection of Jesus remains central to the task of the church. Unlike the apostles, we have not seen Jesus alive ourselves, but we rely on their testimony, and pass the story on in our own generation – in our own neighbourhoods and to the ends of the earth. We can acknowledge that the resurrection is a hard event to believe – but it was just as hard to believe in the apostles’ time as it is in ours. The apostles didn’t try to argue for the resurrection, they simply witnessed to it. What they argued for was what the resurrection proved about Jesus: that he is the king in God’s kingdom and therefore, that he rescues us, rules the world, and is to be loved, worshipped and obeyed.

I had the opportunity of sharing the story of Jesus’ resurrection with a young Aboriginal man a couple of weeks ago. He came from Minyerri, but divides his time between Mataranka, Minyerri, Katherine and Darwin. He didn’t really know any stories about Jesus. The news of Jesus rising from the dead is still news that people around us don’t know. Many do not even know that this is what the Easter festival is about. For us, Easter is at the heart of our faith, and the heart of our witness. Jesus is risen – he is risen indeed.

Bishop Greg Anderson

 

Executive Assistant Diocesan Office Needed

Job Description:

The Anglican Diocese of the Northern Territory is seeking a full time Executive Assistant Diocesan Office located in Darwin.

The Executive Assistant is responsible for providing administrative assistance and support to the Bishop and Executive of the Diocese of the NT. The Executive Assistant is also responsible for providing a high level of customer service by means of attending to incoming phone calls, greeting and directing visitors, responding to enquiries and ensuring the reception area is maintained in a professional well presented manner.

A more detailed position description can be found on our website athttp://www.ntanglican.org.au/people-and-contacts/  or email Mrs Leeanne Zamagias or go to Christian Jobs Australia for more information.

Applications close 28 January, 2018.

This job has been filled: 18.06.2018

Presidential charge to the Synod of the Diocese of the Northern Territory

Bishop Greg Anderson’s Charge to the Synod of the Diocese, Friday May 5th, 2017.

Welcome to the 34th Synod of the Diocese of the Northern Territory. It is a great opportunity for us to meet as representatives from Anglican churches across the Territory, with all of our geographical, social, language and cultural differences, yet fundamentally united as brothers and sisters, because in Christ God has rescued us and brought us into one family. Synod in the Northern Territory is a much more complicated matter than in some other parts of the Anglican Church of Australia. Many people have to travel long distances to be here. We have challenges of accommodation. We have challenges of communication. We have challenges of providing food. I am very grateful to all those who have put in an enormous effort into preparing for this synod. In particular, our Registrar, Leeanne Zamagias, has spent many weeks in gathering and putting together the synod papers and in organising logistics, assisted by Jai Chandler in the diocesan office. Our Ministry Development Officer, Kate Beer, as well as being involved in organising logistics for synod, has worked hard with Keith Joseph and Bruce Chapman on the new Professional Standards Ordinance which will be considering tomorrow. [Read more…]

Bishop Greg’s Easter Message 2017

“So they left the tomb quickly with fear and great joy, and ran to tell his disciples.”

Bishop Greg Anderson

I guess we are so used to the outline of the Easter story that we easily lose the details that ring so true-to-life. There’s an example in that sentence I just read out. Running is not a common activity in the New Testament, because first-century Palestine was not really a running culture. In particular, women were not runners. But the Easter story, not just in Matthew’s account, but in John’s as well, features quite a lot of running. These women run to tell the disciples the news they have just heard from the angel, that Jesus is no longer dead in the tomb but has risen.

[Read more…]

Upcoming Safe Ministry Days

We will be conducting Safe Ministry Training in the near future. The dates are as listed as well as details on what is involved. Please download the PDF poster to share with those whom this may be of interest.

A flyer for the upcoming training can be found here:  SM Awareness Workshop – Darwin 2018

Darwin –  Sunday 16th September 2018 11:30am to 4:30pm

Christ Church Cathedral
Smith St, Darwin

         Darwin Rural – Saturday 17th November 2018 9:00am to 2:00pm

         The Church of the Good Shepherd                                                                                    30 Bees Creek Road, Fred’s Pass